Recipe of the Week: Taralli

Buona serra! Guys, can you tell that I’m trying to extend my recent Italian vacation as long as I possibly can? 😉 In my defense, this truly is a simple, yummy, and extremely versatile recipe, and I’m hoping that you like it.

Before I go any further, I’ll need to address some FAQs/PAQs (potentially askable questions) that I hope are helpful. I was going to make a separate entry, but I’m not exactly rollin’ in the fanmail. Here we go:

Q: How do I make a comment on your blog?

A: Click on the little grey icon in the top right corner of each post that looks like a round speech balloon. It will then take you to the page where you can comment and read others’ comments.

Q: Now that Italy’s over, what’s next for IC?

A: DON’T REMIND ME! :-‘( But to answer your question, IC will still live long and prosper. As traveling is a true passion of mine, I will continue to document the places I travel in the same detail I did Italy. If I’m only there for a short period of time, I will probably do “X in 24 Hours”-type posts, which are always fun! I’m also passionate about food, so in addition, I will try and post at least one recipe and/or restaurant review per week. Who knows, maybe I’ll have an occasional philosophical post here and there. All-in-all, I will never post less than once a week and I will make every effort to make each entry applicable to the populace (rather than just a long-winded, pointless rant).

Q: Can I use your pictures/other material for my own purposes?

A: Sure, why not. It’d be kind weird to take it and pass it off as your own, but otherwise I’m not some artist or remotely well-known person, so go nuts.

OKAY! Now that we’ve gotten that stuff out of the way, let’s take a journey through the wonderful world of taralli.

Readers of IC have become familiar with taralli through reading about my obsession with it. Like most pugliese cusine, the ingredients are simple, but the flavor is strong. These tiny, crunchy, bagel-like biscuits are commonly served with an aperitivo or with bread before dinner. While they are often tinged only with the light flavor of olive oil, they are often made with finocchio (fennel), peperoncino, or even primitivo wine!

Traditional Pugliese Taralli

(Adapted from Italian Connection)

Prep Time: 1 hours, 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hours, 40 minutes

Yield: About 25 taralli

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all purpose flour for crunchy taralli; cut with “00” flour as needed for softer taralli (I used 1/4 cup “00”)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tbsp water (if dough is too dry)
  • 1-2 tsp fennel seeds or cracked black pepper
Look at that fancy salt!
Look at that fancy salt!

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt.
  2. Add the oil and wine, and mix with a fork until the dough forms into a rough mass.
Does this count as "rough"?
Does this count as “rough”?

3. Dump the dough onto a wooden board and knead it for about 5 minutes, until it is smooth.

TA-DA!
TA-DA!

4. Knead the spices into the dough (or divide the dough and add spice to ½ of the dough) – knead well to distribute the spice.

5. Cover the dough and let it rest, along with your arms, for 15-30 minutes.
6. Pinch walnut-sized pieces of dough, roll first between your hands, and then against the wooden cutting board, so that the dough forms a thin rope, about ½ inch (1 cm) in diameter and 4” long (10 cm).

image-3 image-4

7. Shape each rope into a ring, and seal the edges together by pressing lightly, then set aside the taralli rings on a wooden board and cover with a towel.

image-5

8. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to boil.

We moved the party over here!
We moved the party over here!

9. Put 6-10 of the taralli into the boiling water, and when they float to the surface – this will only take 30-60 seconds – remove them with a slotted spoon and place them on a cloth to dry and cool.

The texture they have after boiling
The texture they have after boiling

Tip: Try not to plop one tarallo on top of another when dropping them into the pot, and if they stick to the bottom, give them a gentle nudge with the slotted spoon.
10. Put the cooled taralli on baking sheets and bake in a preheated oven at 375°F (200°C) for about 25 minutes, until golden.

Ahhhh che bello!

11. Remove and cool on racks on racks on racks.

So how did they turn out? Pretty decent, I’d say. They’re a little “airier” than the taralli we bought in Italy, but they are quite flavorful (particularly of fennel) and just as addicting. If I were to redo the recipe again, I’d probably add some other flavors – maybe even go bold with chocolate!

Thought of the day: Before you complain about having to help someone, think about how much better you’ll feel after you do it.